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Policeman made illegal search for information about girlfriend's family – was sacked

The policeman made several unauthorised searches on his new girl-friend and her family in the internal police IT system. Now he has lost his job – but the police disciplinary board was not unanimous. One member thought the policeman had behaved properly both before and after the incident.
A policeman was sentenced at Kristianstad district court for seven cases of hacking. He was also found guilty of breaches of confidentiality. Now he has lost his job.
A policeman was sentenced at Kristianstad district court for seven cases of hacking. He was also found guilty of breaches of confidentiality. Now he has lost his job.
Foto: Tomas Löwemo

In December 2020 a policeman who works in Skåne was sentenced at Kristianstad district court for seven cases of hacking. He was also found guilty of breaches of confidentiality.

The offences occurred in 2018.

During the trial the policeman said that he had just fallen in love and wanted to look at the woman's passport photo. That was why he searched for her name in the police IT-system.

"Colleagues who are suspected of a crime most often choose themselves to resign at once"

A policeman may only make a search in the police IT-system if it is necessary for police work.

That he looked for information about her relatives was a mistake, and the search was in the line of duty.

He has also informed a young woman that she was not wanted by the police. Such information is not made public by the police.

The policeman was fined 18,000 crowns.

Anders Olofsson, local head of police in Kristianstad, says policemen convicted of a crime usually resign of their own accord before the case goes to PAN.
Anders Olofsson, local head of police in Kristianstad, says policemen convicted of a crime usually resign of their own accord before the case goes to PAN.
Foto: Lasse Ottosson

Before the trial Polisens personalansvarsnämnd (PAN, Police Human Resources Board) said that if the man was found guilty, he would lose his job. That is now the case. The board reached the decision in May.

– At the same time as the colleague was informed of PAN's decision he was immediately dismissed from his post, says Anders Olofsson, head of the local police area.

– Colleagues who are suspected of a crime most often choose themselves to resign at once, he says.

One member (of eight) of PAN thought the man should be allowed to retain his position; the policeman has carried out his duties both before and after the event, and three years have passed since then.

Facts

Police Human Resources Board (PAN)

Has eight members.
The Board meets once a month. On the agenda there are usually five to ten matters concerning police or civil employees, sometimes police students as well.
The Board can choose to take no steps against trivial misdemeanours . Serious crimes, such as assault or theft, can lead to dismissal.
The number of cases of hacking has increased. The number of cases of firearms being accidentally discharged or wrongly used has also increased.
PAN's decisions are most often unanimous.
The Board is led by Anders Thornberg, National Police Commissioner.
Anders Thornberg, National Police Commissioner .
Anders Thornberg, National Police Commissioner .
Foto: Pontus Lundahl/TT